Vision 1 Goal

Workforce Development

The City is providing New Yorkers with opportunities to develop new skills, enter the workforce, and earn wages that allow them to achieve economic stability, regardless of their starting skill level or educational attainment. The Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development (WKDEV) continues to shift the workforce system to emphasize education, employment skills, advancement, and wage growth potential. Through its Career Pathways strategy, the City fosters a more inclusive workforce by targeting three key policy areas: building skills employers seek, improving job quality, and increasing system and policy coordination.


Data from the New York State Department of Labor shows that the number of jobs in the city reached a record high of 4.5 million in December 2017, and workers experienced an average increase in wages of 4.7 percent between December 2016 and December 2017. As the New York City economy continues to expand, Career Pathways is critical to supporting prosperity across the five boroughs and ensuring that all New Yorkers can benefit from the city’s success.

IndicatorPrevious DataLatest Data
Increase workforce participation rate from current rate of 61 percent60.3% (2017)TBD
Increase the number of individuals receiving City sponsored, industry-focused training each year to 30,000 by 202016,161
(2016)
21,331
(2017)

Expanded CUNY ASAP program to help more students earn associate degrees

The City University of New York (CUNY) ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs), which had 4,000 students in 2014, is on track to reach its full expansion goal of 25,000 students by academic year 2018–2019. By providing students with supports, including advisement, tutoring, and fee waivers, ASAP students graduate at rates that are more than double those of non-ASAP students and graduates are empowered to enter the workforce or continue in four-year college programs.


Created industry partnerships to build pathways to good jobs

Since 2014, the City has launched five industry partnerships (IP) in key employment sectors: healthcare, technology, industrial/manufacturing, construction, and food service. These IPs work collaboratively with a diverse set of stakeholders, including employers, community-based organizations, organized labor, philanthropy, government, training providers, and educational institutions, to identify employers’ needs for qualified talent and develop solutions to address those needs. Ultimately, IPs support the economic vitality of the city through job opportunities for New Yorkers and quality talent for local businesses. The NYC Food and Beverage Hospitality Council, for instance, launched Stage NYC, which provides out of school/out of work youth with on-the-job and classroom training to prepare them for careers in the restaurant industry.


Expanded CTE programs to enhance students’ technical skills and support work-based learning

Since 2015, 40 new Career Technical Education (CTE) programs have been launched as the City invests in a range of systems and structures to ensure high-quality CTE instruction and work-based learning opportunities. Work-based learning experiences for students have exceeded the initial goal of increasing paid internships by 1,000 over three years. The quality of these placements has also been enhanced due to the sector-based engagement of high-value industry partners.


Launched Computer Science for All to ensure every public school student gets a computer science education

In September 2015, the City launched Computer Science for All, an ambitious program to ensure that all NYC public school students receive meaningful, high-quality computer science education at each school level by 2025. The NYC Department of Education (DOE) and partner organizations offer an array of professional learning opportunities to train nearly 5,000 teachers across elementary, middle, and high schools.

As of fall 2018, the program is already making a major impact as approximately 940 teachers received Computer Science for All training to bring back to a total of 524 New York City schools spanning elementary, middle, and high school. Additionally, since its launch, the number of students taking an AP Computer Science exam more than tripled in 2017 and the number of students passing an AP Computer Science exam increased more than fourfold.


Increased enrollment in summer job programs to provide more youth with valuable work experience

Enrollment in the Summer Youth Employment Program and Ladders for Leaders has increased by 50 percent over the past three years. By promoting greater alignment and collaboration across the youth workforce system, the City’s Center for Youth Employment and its partners are helping youth gain employment and work experience. Career exploration services are provided as well.


Best for NYC Business Coaching — Helping small businesses invest in their workforce.

The Best for NYC program aims to help employers learn about and adopt practices that benefit their workers and their bottom lines. The program is the first City-led campaign of its kind and leverages impact assessment tools developed by B Lab, a nonprofit organization that certifies businesses globally for positive social and environmental impact.  In 2017, Best for NYC partners received philanthropic support to pilot a business coaching model that will serve at least 20 businesses in the Bronx and yield learnings that can be replicated. This program builds on the Career Pathways goals to build a network of businesses that assess their practices and learn about tools to create high quality jobs.


Increased enrollment in summer job programs to provide more youth with valuable work experience

Enrollment in the Summer Youth Employment Program and Ladders for Leaders has increased by 50 percent over the past three years. By promoting greater alignment and collaboration across the youth workforce system, the City’s Center for Youth Employment and its partners are helping youth gain employment and work experience. Career exploration services are provided as well.