Photograph of a student taking an electronics class.
Photograph of a student taking an electronics class.
OneNYC 2050 : Volume 3 of 9 : An Inclusive Economy

Grow the Economy with Good-Paying Jobs and Prepare New Yorkers to Fill Them

The City will continue to promote economic growth policies that tackle income inequality head-on by leveraging private-sector growth and the City’s own investments in technical assistance and workforce development to improve economic opportunity for all.  This will provide on-ramps to entry-level jobs and real career paths that ensure access to the middle class.

Creating Opportunities for All New Yorkers to Participate in the Tech Economy

New York City’s Tech Ecosystem Employs Nearly 300,000 Workers. This figure is likely to grow as technology continues to power innovation across industries. Tech jobs now encompass all businesses and every industry. The average annual salary in the tech sector is $70,000 to $80,000. To ensure all New Yorkers have access to such opportunities, the City is investing in comprehensive technology training at all levels.

  • The Department of Education’s CS4All (Computer Science for All) initiative, announced in 2015, is on track to train 5,000 teachers in computational thinking, problem-solving, and creativity. By 2025, all of the City’s 1.1 million public school students will receive a meaningful, high-quality computer science education at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. This effort is supplemented by after-school programs and partnerships with a diverse array of businesses and organizations, from Girls Who Code to Google, to encourage students from diverse backgrounds to dive deeper into tech education. (See more in Equity and Excellence in Education)
  • At the college level, CUNY 2X Tech is a new Tech Talent Pipeline initiative to double the number of City University of New York (CUNY) students who graduate with a tech-related bachelor’s degree by 2022, by better aligning tech education with industry needs. The City is creating more resources for adult and out-of-school learners. The Tech Talent Pipeline’s Web Development Fellowship program, in partnership with Fullstack Academy, helps prepare residents to launch new careers as web developers.
  • As part of the Cyber NYC initiative, the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) will launch a six-week bridge program with CUNY’s LaGuardia Community College to prepare adults to enter a programming boot camp course. In the next four years, the City will continue to create new pathways into tech — particularly for those who may have nontraditional backgrounds or are making the switch from another industry.
  • New York City’s public libraries also offer a critical bridge to digital access and knowledge. The three library systems offer internet access and the ability to use Wi-Fi hotspots. Queens Public Library’s Tech Lab serves as a hub for innovation and technology, offering hands-on classes and drop-in access to Adobe Creative Suite, 3D printing, graphic design, and more. Colocated in New York City Housing Authority’s Queensbridge Houses, the Tech Lab is a resource that empowers users by offering workshops on and open access to a variety of digital and maker tools. In 2018, the Tech Lab had over 2,500 attendees participate in 270 workshops.
  • The #TECH51 program provides a pipeline for residents of New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) to gain access to no-cost training and job opportunities to become an IT professional. The program partners with existing IT training workforce organizations to recruit and support aspiring technologists in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens.
Photograph of people attending Mothercoders, a part-time nine-week technology training program with on-site childcare.

Participants in Mothercoders, a part-time nine-week technology training program with on-site childcare.

Diversify the City’s Economy and Broaden Access to Good-paying Jobs

An inclusive economy means protecting core industries essential to maintaining our leading role in the global economy, focusing on growing sectors that create good-paying jobs, and supporting emerging industries such as cybersecurity and digital health care for which New York City is well positioned to become a global hub. Equally important is the need to align investments in these sectors with programs to create career pathways for underemployed New Yorkers and jobseekers with low educational attainment by ensuring access to training and other opportunities for career advancement. As part of this commitment, in 2018, the City launched ApprenticeNYC, a first-of-its-kind program to create 450 paid apprenticeships in the industrial, health, and tech industries by 2021.

We’re committed to attracting employers that are building a more competitive and inclusive economy. The City will continue to provide resources to these businesses through the Best for NYC program. To support growth in high-opportunity sectors, the City will invest in programming and technical assistance, workforce development, and adequate commercial and industrial space.

  • Grow the tech sector and invest in diverse tech talent
    New York City is already a global tech hub, supported by world-class research, a deep well of talent, and major industries, from banking to media to health care, that feed a robust tech ecosystem. The City is committed to investing in emerging industries that leverage technology, such as urban tech, cybersecurity, and blockchain. As part of Cyber NYC, a $100 million public-private investment to meet growing threats from cyberattacks, the City will also launch the Global Cyber Center to provide the tools and connections cyber start-ups need to grow, catalyzing the creation of 10,000 good-paying jobs in the sector. Blockchain is another emerging technology that will change how businesses create and store information. The City launched the NYC Blockchain Center in Flatiron to provide shared space, public education, and business support. To strengthen that investment, the City also launched the NYC BigApps Blockchain Challenge, and sponsors Blockchain Week to keep New York City at the forefront of innovation in this technology.
  • Address climate change and create green jobs
    New York City is addressing climate change head-on, committing to carbon neutrality by 2050, and adapting our city to emerge stronger from the impacts of climate change. This will generate economic activity,  and open up opportunities in the green economy as we transform our energy system, retrofit our buildings, innovate green forms of production, and protect residents from environmental hazards. Promoting local hiring policies through City-funded contracts will create opportunities for good-paying jobs with career paths. The City will expand access to the green economy beyond the Green Jobs Corps initiative by launching training programs, providing pathways into career-track jobs, developing pre-qualified lists, and supporting business development.
  • Meet the health care needs of the future while creating good-paying jobs
    Health care plays a huge part in the City’s economy — accounting for one in six jobs in New York City. As the sector rapidly changes, driven by trends in population health, including the continued growth of chronic conditions and improved understanding of mental health, as well as technological advances, the City will ensure it is meeting these challenges head-on while creating new career opportunities for all New Yorkers.
    With a growing senior population, the City must change the way it provides health care and other services to meet the needs of older residents. Many seniors receive unpaid care from relatives. According to a 2018 survey conducted by the City, there are about a million unpaid caregivers in New York City, mostly women over 50, many of whom are struggling financially. Additionally, while there is growing demand for entry-level health care positions such as home health aides, community health workers, and certified nursing assistants, these positions are often poorly compensated and provide limited pathways to advancement and higher wages. The City will invest in programs and initiatives that elevate entry-level positions in health care and provide a career track within the industry, such as for Career and Technical Education (CTE) high school students who transition to nursing.Advances in life sciences and health care technologies are leading to the development of new business models and jobs. As part of a $500 million initiative to make New York City a world-class life sciences hub, the City launched a life sciences internship program that has placed 81 interns, and announced a partnership with BioLabs@NYULangone, a 50,000 square-foot wet lab incubator, for up to 30 start-ups. By 2020, NYCEDC will launch an entrepreneurial center that will provide affordable space and support services for start-ups. Additionally, the third phase of the development of the Alexandria Center for Life Science in Kips Bay will open in 2022, and is expected to create 1,500 good-paying jobs.The Digital Health Marketplace program is designed to help companies with market-ready products access and develop relationships with potential customers such as health systems, insurers, and pharmaceutical companies. Since its launch, the program has facilitated more than 1,100 matches between start-ups and prospective clients, supported more than 25 product pilots, and helped create more than 215 new jobs. The City has committed to three additional years of expanded operations for the Digital Health Marketplace.
  • Stabilize and expand the City’s industrial sector
    Industrial and manufacturing jobs provide good wages and career growth, especially for residents without postsecondary degrees. While the number of production-oriented positions has declined for decades due to automation, off-shoring, and competing uses for land, industrial jobs remain crucial to a 21st century economy — and the industry continues to grow and evolve here in New York City. Many of the City’s industrial businesses are connected to the City’s major industries such as fashion, television, and theater, while others are on the cutting edge of technology and product development. The City is continuing to invest in programs and leverage land use regulation to stabilize and grow these sectors, as laid out in its 2015 Industrial Action Plan.
    Since then, the City has been investing in affordable industrial spaces and more strategically activating its own properties for this purpose. Futureworks NYC consists of partnerships, services, and spaces dedicated to supporting advanced manufacturing. Initiatives include an incubator to support hardware start-ups, a network of fabrication and prototyping facilities, training programs to help established manufacturers adopt new technologies, and the Futureworks Makerspace at the Brooklyn Army Terminal for advanced manufacturing. The space offers affordable access to advanced manufacturing equipment, workspace, classes, storage, and design services. Bridge programs provide both career services and formal educational training in areas such as reading, writing, and computer skills with occupation-specific training. Brooklyn Army Terminal is a key industrial hub that opened up more than 500,000 square feet of new industrial space last year, creating space for 1,000 new jobs; and it continues to support growth-stage industrial businesses through three new micromanufacturing hubs in buildings A and B, and the continued tenanting of the food manufacturing hub in the Annex building. The Brooklyn Navy Yard is on target to house 17,000 more jobs by 2020, and its 2018 master plan includes an additional 5.1 million square feet of new development that will bring the number of jobs at the yard to 30,000 in the coming decades. The City continues to strengthen the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center, a critical element of the City’s food distribution network. Future initiatives include renovating the wholesale markets to meet market needs and improve their sustainability, remediation of legacy environmental assets, and strengthening the connections to the nearby community. Additionally, a regional food hub for locally produced foods is scheduled to open in 2021 on City-owned land.
  • Continue to support the City’s creative sector
    New York City is a global capital of art and culture. Museums, concert halls, theaters, clubs, festivals, and public art showcase creative work from the City and around the world. The City’s fashion, film and television, media and design, and music industries are essential drivers of our local economy, but face challenges such as a lack of affordable space due to their unique needs. The Made in NY Campus at Bush Terminal will be a first-of-its-kind campus for creative production industries in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. In 2021, the City will complete construction of a garment hub and perform public-realm improvements to connect Sunset Park residents to Bush Terminal Park and the waterfront. By 2022, the south portion of the campus will be complete, including film and TV studios. In addition, the City is actively working to preserve existing jobs and businesses in the historic Garment District of Manhattan, which remains a critical hub for the fashion sector. New York City is also strengthening its eclectic nightlife industry, which includes approximately 25,000 businesses that collectively employ 300,000 people. The City’s new Office of Nightlife is launching initiatives to support nightlife businesses and workers, making it easier to interface with the City and operate in partnership with local communities, creating legal pathways for “DIY” spaces, and starting a Nightlife Freelancers Hub
NYCxDESIGN

New York City Is An International Leader In Design, With 10 Of The Nation’s Best Design And Architecture Schools, And More Designers Than Any Other Metropolitan Area In The United States. NYCxDESIGN, run by NYCEDC and informed by a steering committee of leaders from New York City’s design community, is a global celebration of design that draws attendees from around the world. During NYCxDESIGN, the city’s design leadership is on display through exhibitions, installations, trade shows, panels, and events across the five boroughs. The 2018 edition took place over 13 days, with nearly 400 events, 336,000 attendees, and almost $110 million spent by visitors alone. In January 2019, the City announced SANDOW, a global leader in design media and innovation, had been selected to operate NYCxDESIGN going forward, with the intention of expanding its programming, audience, and global reach beginning with the 2020 edition of the program. The new organization will also provide an enhanced platform to showcase the City’s diverse companies, students, and designers to the world.

Photograph of art installation in NYC.

 

Strengthen and Expand the Capacity of Adult Education in a Connected Workforce System

A high school credential is required for roughly 80 percent of jobs with advancement potential, and is a prerequisite for many training programs. Yet more than 1 million residents do not have the equivalent of a high school diploma. The City is committed to increasing the capacity of the adult-education system, which currently provides instruction for nearly 70,000 residents annually. We will capitalize on existing successful models and explore new innovative solutions to help more New Yorkers earn a high school equivalency diploma, which will position them for better jobs, advanced training, and economic security and mobility. We will also connect adult education with the broader workforce system, including employers, apprenticeships, industry partnerships, subsidized jobs, and other training programs, so New Yorkers can access a range of career opportunities.

  • Strengthen and expand Department of Education programming and partnerships
    We will leverage the expertise of the newly-reorganized Department of Education (DOE) District 79, increasing the service age for youth programs from 21 to 24, building and expanding adult Career and Technical Education (CTE) offerings, and fostering instructional partnerships with community providers in order to serve more New Yorkers.
  • Expand CUNY’s Accelerated Study In Associate Programs (ASAP)
    Post-secondary education can provide a critical path to living wage jobs but many too many New Yorkers lack such opportunities. To support such opportunities, the City has expanded its support to Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), an effort focusing on improving college preparation, retention, and graduation rates for community college students. CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) helps students earn associate degrees within three years by providing a range of financial, academic, and personal supports including comprehensive and personalized advisement, career counseling, tutoring, waivers for tuition and mandatory fees, MTA MetroCards, and additional financial assistance to defray the cost of textbooks

Photograph of classroom in NYC.

  • Expand strong bridge program models and explore innovative approaches to bridge programming
    Bridge programs provide both career services and formal educational training in areas such as reading, writing, and computer skills with occupation-specific training and career services. We will increase access to professional development and technical assistance to strengthen existing bridge programs and support programs in launching bridge models, developing service-year bridge programs in order to create paid training opportunities for jobseekers.
  • Expand the reach and support of programs to connect underrepresented communities
    We will engage more New Yorkers by working more intentionally through existing connector programs such as Jails to Jobs, Jobs Plus, and Youth Pathways that focus on specific underrepresented communities. The City will foster partnerships among service providers and connector programs to ensure all New Yorkers have the social supports they need to overcome barriers, complete programs, and advance toward their goals.
  • Partner with Employers
    The City will support employers to foster their employees’ educational attainment and upskilling by connecting employers to adult education providers and the workforce development system. We will also convene employers to explore skills-based hiring using a common skills taxonomy that does not rely on standard credentials, thereby making jobs more accessible to those with lower educational attainment.
  • Launch WorkingNYC
    A network of adult education and workforce development programs and opportunities, Working NYC will increase connections and referrals between employers, educational providers, and specialized programs. We will create and launch a Citywide campaign highlighting this network, introducing career opportunities and helping New Yorkers find opportunities.
  • Advance common metrics across programs
    We will increase accountability and understanding of what works well within the areas of adult education and workforce development by expanding the use of common metrics.
Case Study: Construction Skills Program
Photograph of construction worker in NYC.

Jamel Dickerson. Source: WKDEV

While Jamel and his family weren’t home when Hurricane Sandy struck the Rockaways, they returned to a house in which everything below the first floor was destroyed. The house, which formerly belonged to  Jamel’s grandmother-in-law, has been in his wife’s family for 50 years. His wife’s grandmother wanted the young family to raise their kids in the community.

At the time, Jamel had worked different jobs. He was an energy auditor for a home improvement company, helping to make homes more energy efficient. After the company went out of business, Jamel went to work as a 311 operator. When Hurricane Sandy hit, Jamel knew he wanted to be a part of the recovery effort, so he left his job at 311 and entered the Edward J. Malloy Initiative for Construction Skills training program.

The Construction Skills program, established in 2011, gives New Yorkers from communities throughout the five boroughs the training and skills for careers in the unionized construction industry. Through union apprenticeship programs, the initiative opens doors to career opportunities in the building and construction trades, and thereby helps strengthen the city’s middle class.

For the first two years of his apprenticeship with the Carpenters, Jamel worked exclusively on homes in the Build It Back program. Launched after Hurricane Sandy, and funded by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Build It Back program repairs, rebuilds, and elevates homes to enhance the resiliency of our waterfront communities. Jamel says he won’t rest until every one of his neighbors is back in a strong, resilient home.

Today, Jamel is in the third year of his apprenticeship and working on the revitalization and transformation of the Moynihan Station, the $2.5 billion expansion of Penn Station in Manhattan. He is continuing to work as a carpenter, but is also learning concrete and building forms, and is training to work on rail tracks as well.

Integrate Human Capital Investment into all City Initiatives

The City has many tools at its disposal to increase access to good-paying jobs, including large-scale capital construction projects and the City’s own hiring policies. When taken with the expanded adult education and workforce system previously described, these initiatives will create accountability and efficiency through common definitions and metrics in both public- and private-sector hiring.

  • Leverage public and private capital investments to create high-quality jobs
    To leverage jobs created through the City’s $100 billion Ten-Year Capital Strategy, the City will, through capital construction investments, explore ways to train low-income residents and connect them to construction careers and projects in their communities. This funding will support workforce diversity and ensure the hiring of local workers and workers from underrepresented groups, including women, people of color, and LGBTQ communities. The City has used this approach through Build It Back, a program to repair, rebuild, and protect homes in communities affected by Hurricane Sandy, and provide residents impacted by Sandy with job training and apprenticeships. The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) also offers an opportunity to integrate these approaches, as its residents include some of the most at-risk individuals with regard to employment and income security. HireNYCHA will create a coordinated system for training and connecting NYCHA residents to jobs related to construction, maintenance, environmental remediation, and pest control. To broaden the impact of projects involving City tax dollars or City property, the City will also advocate for changes in State law to allow for increased employment opportunities resulting from such projects for disadvantaged individuals and individuals from disadvantaged regions. Current State legislation makes it challenging to implement effective hiring policies that benefit the communities that often surround redevelopment projects or other projects involving the expenditure of City tax dollars. To improve the effectiveness and accountability, and expand the scope of current hiring policies, the City will launch a campaign to change state law, so the City can implement policies with teeth.
  • Make the Civil Service system more accessible to all New Yorkers
    New York City will be a model employer of choice, ensuring our workforce is reflective of the diversity and inclusion of New York City communities. Not only do inclusive employment policies contribute to enhancing the skills of underrepresented groups of New Yorkers — they also strengthen the City’s performance, increase the economic security of previously excluded professionals and their families, enhance trust in government with a workforce that reflects the community it serves, and create a pipeline of young leaders to join New York City government.Some City agency careers require only a high school diploma or some college credits, which helps residents enter and remain in the City workforce. The City is  exploring ways it can streamline processes to make these jobs more available to all residents. Approaches could include identifying potential entry-level opportunities and apprenticeships within trade, craft, maintenance, and inspection positions across City agencies and in the future, developing and piloting apprenticeship programs within identified job categories.The City will also continue targeted recruitment in communities underrepresented in City government, such as LGBTQ, veterans, youth, and people with disabilities. The City will continue to make the job application and examination process more accessible for residents of all backgrounds with modern application systems and expanded computer-based testing centers in all five boroughs. This will allow even more New Yorkers to take exams and access civil service information in their communities.The City continuously explores ways to increase access to civil service and employment opportunities for all New Yorkers. Our newly launched Civil Service Pathways Fellowship (CSPF) program speaks to that effort. CSPF places highly qualified recent CUNY graduates into entry-level, career-track positions within City government, and provides them with specialized training while preparing them for a civil service exam after the first year of work. In addition, the City will now seek legislative approval to expand fee waivers for veterans seeking to take civil service exams, thereby removing financial barriers for veterans pursuing a civil service career.
Words can’t even describe how I’m feeling. To have the opportunity to join the carpenters union because of Sandy and stay in my neighborhood and rebuild the community makes it all worth it.
– Jamel Dickerson
Support the Growth and Retention of Small Businesses

New York City is home to more than 230,000 small businesses, 50 percent of which are owned by immigrant New Yorkers. Small businesses are essential to both the local economy and the character of our neighborhoods, providing opportunities for individuals to strengthen their own economic security and employ members of their communities. The City supports businesses as they start, operate, and grow by providing free services at scale and investing in innovative projects that create long-term change for entrepreneurs across the City. 

  • Streamline Regulatory Interactions
    The City will create a unique business identifier citywide to track business records across agencies, improving operational efficiency and saving time for small businesses.  Eventually these reforms will allow for a real-time feedback exchange between businesses and regulatory agencies, ensuring that laws, policies, and regulations appropriately balance business interests and public purpose.
  • Ensure Businesses are Resilient
    The City will work to ensure that businesses are resilient and prepared for emergencies. A newly established Business Resiliency Steering Committee will identify the most valuable measures for businesses and facilitate implementation by aligning laws and regulations, by providing business owners with the resources they need to adopt these measures, and by mobilizing businesses across the city to implement them.
  • Support Women Enterepreneurs
    Women Entrepreneurs NYC (WE NYC) addresses the unique barriers women face when starting businesses by providing workshops to equip women with knowledge and skills, networking and mentorship opportunities, free legal clinics, and a crowdfunding platform. The City recently launched WE Fund: Growth, a targeted loan program providing over $5 million in capital to women entrepreneurs. WE Fund: Credit helps women entrepreneurs access lines of credit. WE Venture is a $10 million NYC EDC initiative to encourage Venture Capital Partners to invest in companies founded by women.
  • Support Neighborhood Business
    A complex mix of factors is influencing the retail sector today, from e-commerce to changing consumer habits and preferences. To help small businesses navigate these challenges, SBS will double down on its support of longstanding businesses confronting changing market conditions.  Last year the City launched its Commercial Lease Assistance Program, which provides a range of services including guidance on new leases and lease renewals and assistance with breach of contracts and landlord harassment.  Through the Love Your Local Small Business Grant program, SBS awarded in-depth assessments with business consultants and grant funding to small businesses in neighborhoods with rising commercial rents. SBS will learn from these engagements and test creative business interventions with the aim of developing scalable solutions to support longstanding businesses.
  • Invest in the space for equitable growth
    To continue growing our economy in an equitable way, New York City must have adequate commercial and industrial space, and promote job opportunities in all five boroughs. Policy changes and City investments over the past few years have helped stabilize the decline in industrial and manufacturing jobs. The City has also seen job growth — and not only in Manhattan.
  • Support the creation of modern workspace that brings good jobs closer to New Yorkers
    In today’s rapidly changing economy, small and growing businesses rely on the ability to find flexible, quality workspace that is easily accessible to their workers and clients. This means a growing need for a variety of offices and other workspace in transit-accessible locations outside the Manhattan core, where they can provide opportunities for a local workforce as well as tap into reverse-commute transit capacity. Through City-initiated neighborhood plans, such as in Gowanus, as well as in private applications, zoning can be updated to support the creation of more workspace and jobs for a wide range of businesses. In addition to allowing more flexibility for existing industrial businesses to expand in place, opportunities exist to relieve unnecessary parking requirements in transit-accessible areas, allow new, mid-density, loft-style buildings, and remove outdated distinctions among business types to accommodate the increasing cross-pollination of activities in today’s economy.
  • Relocate City agencies and offices to spur equitable growth across the City
    The City’s office anchor strategy incentivizes new office development in areas away from central business districts by strategically leasing space for City agencies and offices. The Human Resources Administration (HRA) will be the first agency moved in this new program, anchoring at least one development in Brooklyn with 275,000 square feet of office space. The balance of the space in the building will be available for lease to businesses and nonprofits. In addition, HRA’s move will free up office space that it currently occupies in higher-demand areas of the city, thereby delivering additional space for private use.
  • Create affordable workspaces for artists
    Artists in New York City face challenges finding affordable workspaces. In 2015, the City announced a goal of developing 500 units of workspace for the cultural community over the next decade through the Affordable Real Estate for Artists (AREA) initiative. AREA workspace units under development will be rented at below-market rates and made accessible to artists from diverse backgrounds for years to come.
Invest in the Space for Equitable Growth

To continue growing our economy in an equitable way, New York City must have adequate commercial and industrial space, and promote job opportunities in all five boroughs. Policy changes and City investments over the past few years have helped stabilize the decline in industrial and manufacturing jobs. The City has also seen job growth — and not only in Manhattan.

  • Support the creation of modern workspace that brings good jobs closer to New Yorkers
    In today’s rapidly changing economy, small and growing businesses rely on the ability to find flexible, quality workspace that is easily accessible to their workers and clients. This means a growing need for a variety of offices and other workspace in transit-accessible locations outside the Manhattan core, where they can provide opportunities for a local workforce as well as tap into reverse-commute transit capacity. Through City-initiated neighborhood plans, such as in Gowanus, as well as in private applications, zoning can be updated to support the creation of more workspace and jobs for a wide range of businesses. In addition to allowing more flexibility for existing industrial businesses to expand in place, opportunities exist to relieve unnecessary parking requirements in transit-accessible areas, allow new, mid-density, loft-style buildings, and remove outdated distinctions among business types to accommodate the increasing cross-pollination of activities in today’s economy.
  • Relocate City agencies and offices to spur equitable growth across the City
    The City’s office anchor strategy incentivizes new office development in areas away from central business districts by strategically leasing space for City agencies and offices. The Human Resources Administration (HRA) will be the first agency moved in this new program, anchoring at least one development in Brooklyn with 275,000 square feet of office space. The balance of the space in the building will be available for lease to businesses and nonprofits. In addition, HRA’s move will free up office space that it currently occupies in higher-demand areas of the city, thereby delivering additional space for private use.
  • Create affordable workspaces for artists
    Artists in New York City face challenges finding affordable workspaces. In 2015, the City announced a goal of developing 500 units of workspace for the cultural community over the next decade through the Affordable Real Estate for Artists (AREA) initiative. AREA workspace units under development will be rented at below-market rates and made accessible to artists from diverse backgrounds for years to come.

Space for Equitable Growth

New York City’s economic health depends on the continued growth and availability of different types of commercial and industrial spaces. To meet those needs, the City will support the creation of modern spaces in all five boroughs, paying specific attention to high poverty communities and communities of color that have faced historic disinvestment.

Map of the racial makeup of NYC neighborhoods.

Photograph of new construction in NYC.

The Union Square Tech Hub Training Center will include a digital training hub for 21st century jobs and flexible workspace for growing start-ups. The hub will support over 600 jobs in the tech ecosystem and provide a gateway to tech jobs for thousands of New Yorkers, equipping young people with the skills they need to participate in the modern economy.

Architectural rending of new construction in NYC.

Corporate Commons Three is a 330,000-square-foot, LEED-certified office building on the Teleport Campus in Staten Island. It will house office and medical space, a social enterprise restaurant, and an organic rooftop farm.

Photograph of woman using virtual reality equipment.

RLab, an AR/VR Lab in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, will be the first publicly-funded center for entrepreneurship, education, and research in virtual and augmented reality and other emerging technologies. It will create 750 good-paying jobs and support start-ups, talent development, and research and innovation, in partnership with an early-stage fund, a consortium of participating universities, and a workforce development center at CUNY Lehman College in the Bronx.

 

In the East New York Industrial Business Zone, the City is transforming the underused 30,000-square foot City-owned industrial building at Powell Street and Pitkin Avenue into a modern industrial space. The project will include both interior and exterior rehabilitation of the building, and NYCEDC procured a City-and State-certified M/WBE firm to serve as construction manager for the project.

Map displaying residential and industrial zones in NYC.

The Hunts Point Resiliency Project in the Bronx is working with local stakeholders to strengthen energy and flood resiliency for the residents, businesses, and community of Hunts Point. Early phases of the project included feasibility studies for energy resiliency and flood-risk reduction, as well as a conceptual design for a resilient energy pilot project.

Photograph of Hunts Point Resiliency project in Queens.

The Lower Concourse Investment Strategy is a $200 million capital investment strategy to build on the neighborhood’s assets and strengthen the infrastructure that will create jobs, provide affordable housing, and promote connections within the neighborhood to its waterfront and new open space along the Harlem River.

Architectural rendering of new interior space in NYC.

The Downtown Far Rockaway Roadmap for Action was created by community stakeholders, elected officials, NYCEDC, and City agencies to pursue smart, community-driven investments that better connect the neighborhood with job centers, increase economic opportunity, and improve the quality of life for the people who call the area home. Approximately $226 million in City capital and programmatic investments has been dedicated to reestablish Downtown Far Rockaway as the commercial hub of the peninsula and reposition the area as a mixed-use district with new affordable housing and open space.

Map of Downtown Far Rockaway Roadmap for Action

The Jamaica Now Action Plan seeks to build on the strengths of Jamaica, Queens, by providing workforce training and increasing quality jobs and small-business support, initiating new mixed-use development anchored by affordable housing, and improving the livability of the neighborhood through investments in safety measures, green spaces, and more. The plan was created collaboratively through more than 30 meetings between residents, businesses, leaders, and other stakeholders.

Photograph of Jamaica Now Action Plan new development.

The Made in NY campus at Bush Terminal will be a first-of-its-kind campus for creative production industries in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. In 2021, the City will complete construction of a garment hub and perform public-realm improvements to connect Sunset Park residents to Bush Terminal Park and the waterfront. By 2022, the south portion of the campus will be complete, including film and TV studios. New York City is also strengthening its eclectic nightlife industry, which includes approximately 25,000 businesses that employ 300,000 people.